Naima's Published Titles

Monday, March 9, 2015

NIGHT at the DEMONTORIUM: The Complete Anthology

Read a sample at Amazon.

 
Psychological meets supernatural in a room without dimensions known as the Demontorium. This hardcore horror bundle includes Aunt Téa's Addiction, The Entrepreneur, and other Kindle bestselling singles from the Demontorium Series. Nine cautionary tales meant to tighten your grip on the thin layer that separates you from inhabitants of the Demontorium.
 
***
I'm pleased and proud, but don't take my word that it's awesome ...
 
"In her latest book, Naima Haviland takes the reader on a wild, psychotic ride to where the dead and the living are interchangeable and sometimes hard to distinguish. Haviland pulls no punches as her collection of short stories steamroll you from start to finish. So be sure to buckle up—it’s going to be a bone-shaking ride."
~Chuck Walsh, author of A Month of Tomorrows and Shadows on Iron Mountain
 
Available in print and e-book.


Friday, February 13, 2015

Win Books on Valentines Day!




My vampire novel, Bloodroom, is an extremely dark and twisted romance. For Valentines Day, I give you an excerpt where two vampires, Julian and Swisher, argue about what love is.

Join their conversation on Valentines Day, 4PM CMT at the For the Love of the Written Word Facebook event.

What's your definition of love? Tell us for a chance to win one of these great prizes:

1) Bloodroom -- in audiobook
2) Bloodroom and The Bad Death -- a two-fer e-book bundle 
3) Night at the Demontorium: The Complete Anthology -- e-book ARC (or if hardcore horror isn't your thing, an e-book of one of my novels)

See me at 4PM CMT Valentines Day. I can't wait to hear what love means to you!


Saturday, August 23, 2014

Bloodroom is now an Audiobook!


Who could resists those eyes! Wait'll you hear him speak! Yes, Julian Mouret now has a voice, courtesy of award-winning narrator, Paul Heitsch. Bloodroom is now a downloadable audiobook. You can listen to a sample at Amazon, Audible, and iTunes.

For a synopsis and character bios, visit my website's Bloodroom page.


Audiobook reviewers, contact me at http://naimahaviland.com/ for your review copy.

 

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Lighting Pallas: A Photoshop Trick

I recently altered some photos for a cast-of-characters animation on my site thebaddeath.com (the landing page for The Bad Death, the first in a historical trilogy and the second in the Bloodroom series of vampire novels). This blog post explains some tricks I used in Photoshop to make an image more atmospheric. First of all, meet Pallas, as pictured in the image I got from 123rf.com. Pallas is the best friend of the trilogy's heroine, Anika. Pallas is either a victim, a predator, or both. To know for sure, read The Bad Death  ;-)

Once in Adobe Photoshop, I used the Apply Image feature to replace the black backdrop to an image of an outdoor setting. To learn more about this step, read my post called A Photoshop Trick for Book Marketing. After Applying the image to Pallas, I decided to change the lighting on Pallas' image. You see the image above shows the woman in warm lighting. I wanted Pallas to look moonlit because in The Bad Death, Pallas is almost always sighted at night.

To cast a blueish moonlight glow over Pallas, I selected Image from Photoshop's top menu, scrolled the dropdown menu to select Adjust, then chose Variations at the bottom of Adjust's dropdown menu. The Variations pallet visually shows color adjustments. I chose "More Blue" and "More Cyan" to give Pallas a blue cast that would imply moonlight.
I wanted to make the moonlit sky more dramatic, so I copied the layer, cut out Pallas till I had only the sky on the copied layer, then used the blending feature of that layer to alter the sky. The blending feature causes the layer in question to react against the layer beneath it to produce a visual effect. If memory serves, I chose the Hard Light blending option. You can see in the third image how Pallas' background has more contrast between highlight and shadow, resulting from my choice of blending option.

So, there you have it, boys and girls!

Monday, January 6, 2014

South Carolina Gold Rice Cultivation, A Woman's Experience

From findagrave.com
Elizabeth Allston Pringle was a Southern belle at the time of the American Civil War and the daughter of the Governor of South Carolina. When the Civil War ended, leaving her family impoverished, she and her mother opened a school. Motivated by sentiment, Elizabeth bought the plantation she grew up in, White House, and the plantation, Chicora Wood, where she lived as a married woman until her husband's untimely death. Both plantations still exist in Georgetown County, South Carolina, an area known as the Lowcountry. It was in hopes of paying the plantation mortgages that in the early years of the 20th century, she decided to re-cultivate old rice fields that had long since succumbed to the encroaching wild. She was a farmer, a foreman, and an entrepreneur at a time in history when women did not hold such positions.

We might have forgotten Elizabeth Allston Pringle if her journal hadn't been serialized in the New York Sun. This was another way Elizabeth made money to pay the mortgages on her beloved properties. The Sun journal was later published in a book called A Woman Rice Planter. The 1992 edition, published by the University of South Carolina press, is illustrated by famed artist Alice R. Huger Smith (whose paintings are in Charleston's Gibbes Museum of Art) and has an introduction written by South Carolina historian and writer Charles Joyner.

Reading A Woman Rice Planter, you may find the humor in some stories involving black characters to be condescending. I believe the Jim Crow era in which it was written had an unfortunate but partial influence on the author's outlook. However, if you read it thoroughly, I believe you'll also see Elizabeth's respect for blacks rising through this surface attitude. I get a sense that she felt they were all in this together, enjoying the bounty of the Lowcountry and enduring the caprice of its climate with faith and cheerfulness. I read A Woman Rice Planter as research while writing The Bad Death, an antebellum vampire novel set on a Lowcountry rice plantation. Two things stay with me from repeated readings.

Rice Barn at Chicora Wood
One is its detailed description of old rice-growing practices. Second is Elizabeth's love for the beautiful world around her. She was an excellent writer. Her descriptions shine through, transcending ink and paper and time. Here's an entry from June 1, 1903:

"The evening is beautiful; the sun, just sinking in a hazy, mellow light, is a fiery dark red, the air is fresh from the sea, only three miles to the east, the rice-field banks are gay with flowers, white and blue violets, blackberry blossoms, wistaria, and the lovely blue jessamine, which is as sweet as an orange blossom. Near the bridge two negro women are fishing with great strings of fish beside them. The streams are full of Virginia perch, bream, and trout; you have only to drop your line in with a wriggling worm at the end, and keep silent, and you have fine sport. Then the men set their canes securely in the bank just before dark and leave then, and almost invariably find a fish ready for breakfast in the morning. There is a saying that one cannot starve in this country and it is true."

Elizabeth's accounts of her workers' labor, their hunting and fishing, socializing, and storytelling helped me give life to The Bad Death's Gullah heroine, Anika, and her friends and neighbors. The Bad Death's antagonist, Julian Mouret, relies on his working partnership with his mother, Elisabeth. She shares her son's respect for the Lowcountry's wild strength. I'd be lying if I said Elizabeth Allston Pringle didn't partly inspire me when writing Elisabeth Mouret. Elizabeth Pringle was strong, independent, spiritual, and wise. So is Elisabeth Mouret. Anika finds in Miss Elisabeth a formidable foe and improbable ally. Miss Elisabeth is one of my favorite characters in The Bad Death. And Elizabeth Allston Pringle is one of my favorite characters in US history.


Thursday, December 12, 2013

The Bad Death on all eReaders

Previously an Amazon exclusive, The Bad Death is now also available at iTunes, Kobo, and Barnes&Noble.com. Captivating, sensuous, and terrifying, The Bad Death, at once a sequel and a prequel to Bloodroom, unfolds against a background of eighteenth century human bondage and southern gentility. Passion rules the heart but terror rules the night in this breathtaking tale of love, desire, betrayal, Gullah sorcery, and supernatural horror in the antebellum South. 
 

Monday, November 25, 2013

Bloodroom eBook 99 Cent Sale

You can have this sexy and dangerous bad boy for 0.99 cents Monday, November 25 through Saturday, November 30 in any digital format. Just visit Amazon or the online bookstore of your choice.

Online stores vary in the speed with which they adopt new prices. If you see Bloodroom still at its normal $2.99, buy straight from my distributor, Smashwords.

Bloodroom is the first book in the Bloodroom Series of modern and historical paranormal novels. The Bad Death is the second book in the series.